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That is a dangerous place for a cut-out.

Especially if he gets…excited on the job. So to speak.

Well put.

And apparently saved the wings…

loriadorable:

wallflower-punk97:

mikkynga:

this will never stop being funny.

the girl dressed as the boss is the best

is someone dressed as jesus

Someone wants to be a pro sub!

We know someone who looks like Wolverine’s younger, geekier brother, who used to work as the community manager for a gaming company. He’s now teaching integrative Islamic studies at a major university; by report, his students adore him, he’s garnering a TON of professional respect, he’s happier, and he STILL looks like Wolverine’s younger, geekier brother.

So yeah, dressing for your dreams? It doesn’t hurt.

sexaulity:

Tbh

This. All of this. All props to her for this.
Anonymous whispered:
Hey, I am a gay girl born into a Muslim family. The only time I was ever "religious" was as a kid when I was first learning about Islam. Growing up, I went through a lot and started losing faith. Now I feel like I cannot go back to the religion even if I wanted to because of my sexuality. I will never be accepted. I also feel like Islam prioritizes men and as a feminist that goes against what I believe in. Is there still room for me in this religion or should I start searching for another faith?

wocinsolidarity:

occupiedmuslim:

Hey so I crowdsourced a lot of this answer: [updating as I get more suggestions and resources]

Personally, I couldn’t be a Muslim and follow Islam if I didn’t find it feminist, full of social justice and intersectional. Unfortunately patriarchy and self interest tries to pass itself off as moralistic and religious —this is universal. Also it’s helpful to keep in mind that if any authority tries to tell you to hate and discriminate know that it isn’t from God or any moral compass—but fear. 

O you who have attained to faith! Be ever steadfast in upholding equity, bearing witness to the truth for the sake of God, even though it be against your own selves or your parents and kinsfolk. Whether the person concerned be rich or poor, God’s claim takes precedence over [the claims of] either of them. Do not, then, follow your own desires, lest you swerve from justice: for if you distort [the truth], behold, God is indeed aware of all that you do!

- The Holy Qur’an [4:135]

believe the Prophet Muhammad [saw] was a radical-feminist-environmental anti-racist community organizer, activist and freedom fighter that believed in freeing people from the status quo and freeing them from oppression through Islam and Allah [swt]. And I believe in following that tradition.

“Truly, God does not change the condition of a people until they change what is in themselves.” (Quran 13:11)

I believe it was Aisha [ra] that had a close friend that was a hijra and didn’t wear a hijab, or covering around them. There was plenty of queer people in and around the Prophet Muhammad’s [s] life time.

I could name-drop Sufi saints and poets from various times and places who violated norms of gender and sexuality on one level or another. Ali ibn Hamzah al-Asadi, more widely known as al-Kisa’i al-Kufi (d.804). As the transmitter of one of the Qur’an’s seven harfs (“readings”) in Sunni tradition, he’s an immeasurably important figure in the history of the Qur’an as a text. As such, his knowledge and character were both under close examination. In one assessment, al-Marzubani, speaking on the authority Ibn al-Arabi (the jurist, not the mystic), described al-Kisa’i as “one of the most learned persons” while adding that al-Kisa’i openly confessed to engaging in acts that included same-sex relations. “Yet,” he adds, al-Kisa’i remained “an accurate reader, knowledgeable in the Arabic language, and honest.” 

This does not answer all questions, but it offers something. In Sunni Islam, there are seven canonical ways of reading the Qur’an. Al-Kisa’i al-Kufi is the man who gave us one of them. He devoted his life to knowing and teaching the Qur’an. It should go without saying that al-Kisa’i al-Kufi memorized the entire scripture by heart and recited it every day of his life. Along the way, he apparently fucked dudes. The lips that he used to recite divine scripture also touched men.

“O people, we created you all from a male and female
And made you into different communities and different tribes
So that you should come to know one another
Acknowledging that the most noble among you 
Is the one most aware of God
Qur’an 49:13
The most noble is the one most aware of God. This is not just incitement for all Muslims to increase their awareness of God – it is also a warning to pursue a policy of social tolerance. The implication of this verse is that no Muslim is better than another because of any of the social categories that we use to classify ourselves, such as race, ethnicity, economic class, or gender. Or even sexual orientation. A gay or lesbian Muslim is no less than a heterosexual Muslim, except by the intangible criterion of pious awareness of God (taqwa). A transgender
Muslim is no less than other Muslims who have not struggled with their own gender identity and faced the stigma of changing gender classification, except by awareness of God. 
Most Muslims cherish reciting this verse to oppose the evils of racial superiority, ethnic chauvinism, and class arrogance. Yet some see this verse as a call to justice that rings far beyond its terse words.”
Scott Siraj al-Haqq Kugle, HOMOSEXUALITY IN ISLAM


El-Farouk Khaki, the founder of Salaam [a queer Muslim organization in Canada] says:  you can connect her w me, or with Daayiee Abdullahmy email is elfin925@rogers.com she can also join https://www.facebook.com/groups/99769188589/  el-Tawhid Juma Circle: Toronto Unity Mosque & learn that there is no singular, monolith Islam, and that for some, Islam is liberationary.

EFK and the rest of the leaders at el-Tawhid Juma Circle: Toronto Unity Mosque page make a point of emphasising the spiritual aspects of Islam and reducing focus on external elements. el-Tawhid Juma Circle: Toronto Unity Mosque group - wholly affirming and inclusive, with a focus on the spiritual and not so much the ritual.


Imam Daayiee Abdullah contact [the gay Imam in DC] (daayiee@aol.com). 

There’s also an Imam in Canada, TO who I know is pro-feminist, cool with gay Muslims and he asked me to give you his number if you would like it.

Some points

1) If you believe that God created you the way are, you can’t possible believe that God would reject you
2) The community you grew up in does not necessarily represent Islam
3) The beauty of Islam is that there is no intercession between you and God. You has every right and ability to pick up the Quran and find out what it means to you. 
4) If you find things you can’t reconcile, you should speak to others who have found themselves in a similar situation.
5) thefatalfeminist.com is a great starting point and introduction to feminism, Islam and social justice.
6) Islam does not prioritize men over women, the patriarchal actualization of Islam as seen through socially constructed norms prioritizes men over women, but that is a product of kyriarchy more than anything. If you want your faith to prioritize women, then do it. 
7) Hit up Scott Kugle at Emory who could give you some nice readings and independent studies for Lesbianism or Queer identities and Islam.

This post pretty much came about because I was asked if I had resources for Muslims who were discovering or newly coming to terms with their sexuality. I didn’t, and the poor advice I had to offer was … poor. So, I pulled up a few of the blogs I followed that are targeted towards queer Muslims, and put together this little post for you!

Queer Muslim Blogs:

Queer Muslim 101:

A good thing to remember is to avoid the self-hatred phase, if you can. Focus on loving yourself, and realising that Allah made you just the way you are, and that you are loved. If this phase is unavoidable, here are some helpful sites:

If you are a student and would like to get Faisal Alam to speak at your uni, or to see if he is coming to your uni soon, click here.

If you would like to attend Faisal Alam’s 2013 Retreat for Queer Muslims and their partners, here is the facebook event, and here is more info. Register for the retreat here.

If you are from Indonesia, Pakistan, Bangladesh, or India and want to share your experiences (anonymously), please click here.

If you can spare some funds, help navigatethestream, a queer Muslim, become an Imam to help the Muslim LGBT* community!

Lastly, here is a link if you are NOT a queer Muslim, but want to be a good ALLY! (And here is another on how NOT to be a saviour!)

Muslim-Queer-Friendly Blogs:

(If you’d like to be added to or taken off this list, please send me an ask.)

More papers/books not previously mentioned:

AWESOME RESOURCE POST!!!

Reblogging because, as mentioned, this is an awesome list of resources. Pass it on or use it if it’s helpful; keep it in mind in case others need it.

heathersketcheroos:

Blerp

“Blerp” to you, too.

theraichujesus:

annethecatdetective:

This little girl is going places.

image

I can easily see this happening.

fozmeadows:

In which seven cats all discover the same slightly elevated flat thing and claim it as their own while pretending the other six cats don’t exist.

Par for the course.

Seven Steps to the Perfect Story

From structure and plot to heroes and characters, your story must have everything in place if it’s to connect with the reader. Follow our guide to storytelling success.

AWESOME

For folks who like their recipes written out:

Ingredients:
1/4 cup olive oil
8 ounces crimini mushrooms, halved and sliced
2 medium carrots, finely diced
2 ribs celery, finely diced
1 large onion, finely diced
1 tablespoon kosher salt
one 35-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes
2 teaspoons fresh sage leaves, chopped
1 teaspoon fresh rosemary leaves, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 1/2 quarts filtered water
3 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
one 2-by-2-inch piece Parmesan rind
7 ounces butternut squash, cubed
5 ounces curly kale, chopped
Two 15-ounce cans great Northern beans, undrained
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
shaved Parmesan, for serving

Directions:
Place 2 tablespoons of the olive oil into an 8-quart stockpot over high heat until the oil shimmers. Add the mushrooms and sauté until browned, about 5 minutes. Remove the mushrooms from the pan and set aside. Decrease the heat to low, add the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil and the carrots, celery, onions and salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 30 minutes.

Add the tomatoes, sage, rosemary and garlic, and cook for 5 minutes, stirring to break up the tomatoes. Add the water, soy sauce and Parmesan rind, increase the heat to high and bring to a boil, about 15 minutes. Decrease the heat to low, add the squash and kale, cover and cook until tender, 30 to 35 minutes.

Return the mushrooms to the pot along with the beans and red wine vinegar and cook until all is heated through, about 15 minutes. Remove the cheese rind and serve warm with shaved Parmesan.

I tend to agree.

ancientart:

Ancient post-it notes!

romkids:

How often do you reach for a Post-It note? Maybe you’re making that to do list, or figuring out your groceries. But you know, what if you lived BEFORE Post-It notes or scrap paper? What would you use then?

In Thebes, where these examples are from, and across the Roman Empire, scraps of used and broken pottery would be used to scribble quick notes. These examples are called ostraka. Most of the ostraka that our conservators and curators are studying right now contain notes on taxes and granary receipts from the second century AD.

The notes are written in Greek script. Kay Sunahara, ROM archaeologist studying these pieces, described the Greek langage at the time as, “the lingua franca of the Mediterranean”. Greek was the most frequently used written language, used to help bridge the gap between speakers of different languages, much like English today.

The majority of these pieces we’re found and acquired in the early 1900’s by none other than ROM founder Charles T. Currelly.

So how are these scrap pieces of pottery useful to archaeology today? Are grocery lists really that valuable? For archaeologists, ostraka provide them with a great deal of information about the people who left these notes in the first place. Information such as what people were eating, trading for, in trouble for, and the prices of things, give us a unique look into those who lived far before us, in this case well over a thousand years ago.

Interestingly enough, it also shows us just how similar we are to those who lived long before. Everyone needs groceries, and a reminder letter, maybe from their mom, or from their husband, of what to get from the store.

National Archaeology Day takes place on October 20th at the ROM and many other museums around the world!

There are similar examples of cuneiform lists, that serve much the same purpose. People don’t think of the everyday uses of the technology of the times, but when it survives to modern day, we can learn far more about the people than if we merely look at their religious or governmental texts.

tessahighlander:

lesbiansarekind0fmything:

babywarrior5:

mccunt:

stangefruitandwildthing:

Geraldine Hoff Doyle, was a 17 years (in 1942) while she was working at the American Broach & Machine Co. when a photographer snapped a pic of her on the job.

That image used by J. Howard Miller for the “We Can Do It!” poster, released during World War II. 

Oh shit, that’s the real “Rosie the Riveter” ?

BAMF

BAMF INDEED. This woman deserves all the respect in the universe!

I need this on my blog. 

this should have way more notes

Step aside, people, Rosie the fucking Riveter is on your dash!

Indeed. Respect, people. She’s awesome now, she was awesome then.

princess-peachie:

(x)

Oh my god they’re cuddlingggggggg ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh \( ;o; )/

Noooooooooooo
Baby bunnies in Uggs I am defenseless send halllllllllp